Humorous Depression 

Despite my morose poetry and almost constant state of sadness, I do illicit chuckles from people every day with my antics and different way of seeing and processing the world. These quotes from actor Ryan Phillipe in the latest issue of “Elle” clearly explain this phenomenon. 

On Depression in general:

It’s just, some people do have this pervading sort of sadness, or they’re so analytical that they can kind of take the fun out of things because they think too much…

You know, depression has been a huge obstacle for me ever since I was a child. As you get older I think it decreases some, but I’m just innately kind of a sad person…

I’m empathetic, and I take on the feelings of others and transpose myself into the position of others. 

On Depression and humor:

And the greatest comedians do—trust me. I know so many of them. And they’re depressed and they’re dark and they have this incredible gift of humor to offer others and also, probably, therapeutically themselves…

It’s a dark humor, like a gallows humor. I think that’s where, if you do carry any of that sadness or depression, your humor does tend to be a little darker than most people.

The part of his interview that stung the most was in reading that his daughter with Reese Witherspoon, Ava, struggles with depression as well:

I see it in my daughter. She has it, and I wish to hell she didn’t.

Him being aware of depression in his own child and wanting it to not be a part of her life is the plight of any parent that struggles with mental health, but depression doesn’t discriminate and if we, as the population who deals with it day-to-day continue to be more open and honest about its effects, the stigma will continue to lift. 

We are loving, aware members of our families and communities. We have voices and, apparently – humor. 

I appreciate Ryan for discussing depression publicly and bringing awareness to its many complexities.

Photo Credit: Charles M. Schulz

0 thoughts on “Humorous Depression 

  1. I don’t think all of rants about publicising depression and is effects has any effect. I feel most “normals” consider what we say as emo outbursts. Not to be taken seriously. It would take people who aren’t depressed but empathise with those who are too talk about it in the publics sphere for some of the stigma to be removed. What do you think?

    Like

    1. I feel that way too at times, but the truth is these “normals” start to relate to what is said and see their reflection in the mirror, and hopefully start to realize they relate. The depressed person is simply sharing what most people don’t have the voice to. That’s the beauty of it for me.

      Liked by 1 person

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